Attendance Matters Facts

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Chronic absence affects all kids, not just the absent ones. Learn how to get kids in #SchoolEveryDay here: http://bit.ly/1oqfID7


Find out how you can keep kids in #SchoolEveryDay – we can solve chronic absence: http://bit.ly/1oqfID7


Chronic absence is easily masked by school attendance statistics, even when average daily attendance appears relatively high. Even in a school with 95% daily attendance, 30% of the student population could be chronically absent. How is that possible? Find out: http://bit.ly/1oqfID7


A growing body of research reveals the prevalence of chronic absence and its critical role in student achievement. This research also shows that chronic absence can be addressed when school districts, communities, and policymakers work together to monitor the problem and implement solutions that target the underlying causes. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/1oqfID7


Too often, we think of reducing absences as the job of parents or school clerks in the front office. But communities across the country have started helping schools address chronic absence by building public awareness and leveraging resources.


Preschoolers who miss too much school don’t develop reading, math & social skills as quickly. #SchoolEveryDay


Principals and school leaders know from experience and common sense what research confirms: Showing up for class matters. Students can’t benefit from investments in high quality instruction and more engaging, rigorous curriculum unless they are in their classroom.


Students lose 14 million school days to asthma each year. Controlling asthma = better attendance. http://bit.ly/1oqfID7 #SchoolEveryDay


A student who is chronically absent in high school is 7.4X more likely to dropout. #SchoolEveryDay


Missing 10% of school days, just 2 days each month, can put children at risk of academic failure.  #SchoolEveryDay


Attendance Awareness Month comes in September. We’re building good attendance habits in our schools.


Attending school regularly helps children feel better about school - and themselves. Start building this habit in preschool so they learn right away that going to school on time, every day is important. Good attendance will help children do well in high school, college, and at work.


By 9th grade, missing 20% of school can be a better predictor of drop-out than 8th grade test scores.

Parents - especially in the early years are best positioned to ensure children attend school and to build expectation around attendance.


Too many absences - excused or unexcused - can keep students from succeeding in school and in life. How many are too many? 10% of the school year - that’s 18 missed days or 2 days a month - can knock students off track.

Attending school regularly helps children feel better about school — and themselves. Start building this habit early so they learn that going to school on time, every day, is important.


Smart policy and Implementation can ensure schools and communities collect, monitor and share attendance data.


There are many things we can do to stem chronic absenteeism. For one, we can help families to build the habit of attendance as soon as children start school. While all families want their children to succeed, many don’t realize that regular attendance matters starting as early as kindergarten or even in prekindergarten. We’ll let everyone know that missing 10 percent of school days, or just two days every month, can put children at risk.


Chronic absence can affect all of our children, not just those missing school. If significant numbers of students in a classroom or school are chronically absent, learning for all students can be adversely affected. The pace of instruction slows down when teachers have to spend time reviewing material for those who missed the lessons in the first place. Learn more about reducing chronic absence in your school.


Improving attendance and reducing chronic absence is not rocket science, but it does take commitment, collaboration and tailored approaches to the particular challenges and strengths of each school community. Across the nation, schools, communities and advocates have successfully taken steps to ensure children are attending school more regularly.


Our best investments in instruction and curriculum won’t matter much if students aren’t in class to benefit from them. We need to ensure that all students are in class regularly so they have an equal opportunity to learn. School leaders can reach out more frequently to families to learn what barriers may be interfering with students getting to school.


A growing body of research reveals the prevalence of chronic absence and its critical role in student achievement. This research also shows that chronic absence can be addressed when school districts, communities and policymakers work together to monitor the problem and implement solutions that address the underlying causes.


Poor attendance can be a problem for very young children, not just those in secondary schools. National data show one in 10 kindergartners are chronically absent. Research shows children who miss too much school in the early grades are more likely to do worse academically and have poor attendance in later years.